book cover of The Man Who Knew Coolidge

The Man Who Knew Coolidge

(1928)
A novel by

 
 
The Man Who Knew Coolidge (subtitled "Being the Soul of Lowell Schmaltz, Constructive and Nordic Citizen") is recounted in a series of six long, uninterrupted monologues by the sub-titular Schmalz. As the reader progresses through each, Schmalz gradually reveals additional details about his background, circumstances, and character. Intended by Lewis as a light intermission between the more substantial Elmer Gantry and his 1929 novel, Dodsworth, The Man Who Knew Coolidge is written in a lighter and more humorous vein than Lewis' best-remembered novels of the 1920s.



Used availability for Sinclair Lewis's The Man Who Knew Coolidge