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Miranda Beverly-Whittemore


USA flag (b.1976)

Miranda Beverly-Whittemore was born in Los Angeles, California in 1976. The daughter of a writer and an anthropologist, she grew up in Senegal, Vermont, and Oregon. In 1998, she graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Vassar College. She has published two novels, The Effects of Light and Set Me Free, and writes full time from her home in Brooklyn.
 

Genres: Mystery
 

Novels
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Novellas
   Frito Lay (2015)
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Miranda Beverly-Whittemore recommends
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Where They Found Her (2015)
Kimberly McCreight
"Coiled as tightly as a spring, Where They Found Her begins with a small town's tragedy and doesn't relent until every secret, and character, is exposed. Kimberly McCreight has written another satisfying, dark page-turner that pounces off the page."
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Luckiest Girl Alive (2015)
Jessica Knoll
"At turns funny, shocking, violent and heart-rending, LUCKIEST GIRL ALIVE hooks its reader and doesn't let go. Jessica Knoll's twisted, twisting debut beautifully explores reinvention, retribution and redemption - and all the rawness in between."
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Black Rabbit Hall (2015)
Eve Chase
"Family secrets, forbidden lust, and a family of four extraordinary children who'll stick with you long after they've scattered off the page. Eve Chase kept me up with her gorgeous descriptions of a crumbling Cornwall estate and the unruly brood who meets tragedy within its walls."
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If We Were Villains (2017)
M L Rio
"Full of friendship, betrayal, and passionate devotion, this is a page-turning literary thriller whose final, shocking twist you won't soon forget."
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The Necklace (2017)
Claire McMillan
"At the center of this passionate novel of inheritance and betrayal lies the titular necklace - with mysterious origins, a tragic past, and an uncertain future. Deftly spanning the globe and a century, McMillan's sharp writing explores whether it is possible to undo our wrongs across generations - or if we are doomed to repeat ourselves."
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The Blind (2017)
A F Brady
"Sometimes stark and often startling, The Blind asks important questions about the arbitrary lines we draw between the sane and 'crazy' members of our society. Along the way, this quick-paced debut novel pulls its reader into a web of deceit, recrimination, and ultimately, redemption."
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The Completionist (2018)
Siobhan Adcock
"Thoughtful, suspenseful, and shot through with dark humor, The Completionist creates a future world near enough to our own that the familiarity stings and sings… the people who inhabit these pages are vivid, defiant reminders of the sustaining powers of purpose, honor, and family love."
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A Hundred Suns (2020)
Karin Tanabe
"A Hundred Suns manages the near impossible: it's both a gripping, relevant page turner, and a searing historical examination--in this case, of the brutal atrocities of colonialism. You'll read, as I did, to find out who will win the game of cat and mouse, even as you come to understand that in Indochine in the 1930's--as it is anywhere that one group of people enslaves another--there was no 'winning.'"
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Unseen City (2020)
Amy Shearn
"Gripping, moving, and vital, Unseen City asks how human life might defy its lifespan--in the throes of love, the conviction of belief, and each person's mark upon a city that will survive them. For two days, I laughed at Amy Shearn's wry humor and gasped at her gorgeous sentences; I couldn't put this brilliant book down until its perfect final line (and I'm haunted still--which is appropriate, I suppose)!"
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The Stranger Behind You (2021)
Carol Goodman
"Foreboding and moody...As you’re pulled deeper into its crumbling corridors and gothic history, you’ll never guess where its true threats lie."

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