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Stephen Graham Jones


(b.1972)

Stephen Graham Jones is the author of eight novels and two collections. Stephen's been a Shirley Jackson Award finalist three times, a Bram Stoker Award finalist, a Black Quill Award finalist, an International Horror Guild finalist, a Colorado Book Award Finalist, a Texas Monthly Book Selection, and has won the Texas Institute of Letters Award for Fiction and the Independent Publishers Award for Multicultural Fiction. He's also been a Texas Writers League Fellow and an NEA fellow in fiction. His short fiction has been in Cemetery Dance, Asimov's, Weird Tales, The Magazine of Bizarro Fiction, etc., as well as all the journals: Open City, Black Warrior Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Literal Latte, Cutbank, and on and on, some hundred and thirty stories, total, through every letter of the alphabet.


Though Blackfeet, Stephen was born in 1972 in West Texas. This is often confusing, as most Blackfeet are in Montana and he grew up working from tractors and horses and in all kinds of welding and automotive shops. There was also lots of hunting and basketball and various scrapes with the law. After getting his PhD from Florida State University in a record two years, Stephen, twenty-eight then, went to work in the warehouse at Sear's (all he ever planned), but injuries forced him into teaching. And it's not a bad life, being a professor. Stephen made full professor at thirty-six--likely the youngest full prof in the humanities at The University of Colorado at Boulder (and maybe all of Colorado) and is into fiction, comics, film, screenwriting, and anything horror or fantasy, western or science fiction. Or, just anything that tells an interesting story in an interesting way.

Genres: Horror
 
Awards
Bram Stoker Best Novel nominee (2016) : Mongrels
World Fantasy Best Novella nominee (2018) : Mapping the Interior


Stephen Graham Jones recommends
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Pike (2010)
Benjamin Whitmer
"This is what noir is... blunt force drama stripped down to the bone, then made to dance across the page."
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Everything Under the Moon (2016)
Jeff Johnson
"This is the werewolf as you haven't seen it before; talking like a Richard Kadrey novel, walking through Charlie Huston's dark streets, and snarling like a Jim Harrison creature."
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In the Valley of the Sun (2017)
Andy Davidson
"I burned through this. It's got teeth on every page."
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In the River (2017)
Jeremy Robert Johnson
"I've seen the future and it's bizarre, it's beautifully berserk, it's Jeremy Robert Johnson."
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The Murders of Molly Southbourne (2017)
(Molly Southbourne)
Tade Thompson
"This premise fleshes out the strangeness and the grace of the human condition as well as anything I've read."
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Unbury Carol (2018)
Josh Malerman
"Unbury Carol is a Poe story set in the weird west we all carry inside us, and it not only hits the ground running, it digs into that ground, too. About six wonderful feet."
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Old Ghosts (2019)
Nik Korpon
"Who you are is who you’ve been, for better or for worse. There’s old ghosts everywhere, but, now, as far as I’m concerned, there’s only one Old Ghosts, and it’s Nik Korpon’s."
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The Immortal Conquistador (2020)
(Kitty Norville, book 15)
Carrie Vaughn
"No surprise to anyone, but Carrie Vaughn can write the sixteenth century up through the Old West as well as it’s been done. And it just feels so good to sneak back into the Kittyverse through the vampire door."
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The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires (2020)
Grady Hendrix
"Every vampire novel is going to have blood and teeth, but this one’s got that one essential ingredient that nobody else does like Grady Hendrix: heart. These aren’t characters, they’re people, and I consider myself lucky to have known them for a few pages."
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Of Mice and Minestrone (2020)
(Hap and Leonard Collections)
Joe R Lansdale
"There’s a place in East Texas where story shades into memory, where violence and tenderness are just part of the wonder of living, and that’s precisely where Joe Lansdale lives, and writes from, and we’re all the better for it. The eating’s pretty good there, too, as Hap’s recipes more than attest. You leave this book hungry, both for food and to start the whole series all over again, live through it one more time, maybe just live there a while."
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Clown in a Cornfield (2020)
Adam Cesare
"This party starts early, and it does not stop until all the bodies have hit the floor."
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Winter Counts (2020)
David Heska Wanbli Weiden
"Winter Counts drops the hammer on page one and never lets up, until you're not sure if that's the drums in the story or your heart in your chest pounding."

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